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King Tides Hitting Central Florida’s Beaches

Screenshot of Volusia County's New Smyrna Beach Cam.

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King tide is a general term for the highest tides of the year, which happen in the fall. National Weather Service Meteorologist Tony Cristaldi said king tides are pushing more water onto our beaches just slammed by the hurricane.

“You know the beaches are in pretty bad shape from Hurricane Matthew, so you have a combination of factors that are really putting a one-two punch on the Volusia and Brevard beaches,” said Cristaldi.

Beach erosion is leaving jagged sand areas for beach goers. In the water, king tides coupled with strong winds over the past week have caused choppy surf and high breaking waves of 4 to 6 feet.

King tides usually start to wane in November.

 


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About Crystal Chavez

Crystal Chavez

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