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US Health and Human Services Declares a Public Health Emergency After Hurricane Michael


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The emergency health response team includes HHS providers as well as Florida Department of Health workers. Photo: Flickr Creative Commons

The emergency health response team includes HHS providers as well as Florida Department of Health workers. Photo: Flickr Creative Commons

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A public health state of emergency has been declared in Florida after Hurricane Michael. Medical personnel have been deployed at the national level to respond. A team of seven people from the Orange County Health Department has been sent to help with recovery efforts after Hurricane Michael.

Dr. Kevin Yeskey of the US Department of Health and Human Services says the agency’s classification will allow more people to continue to get treatment under Medicaid and Medicare after the storm.

He says this includes people with critical health needs that require immediate attention.

“That’s people with dialysis machines and respirators who would die without these otherwise.”

A team of seven people from the Orange County Health Department has been sent to help with recovery efforts after Hurricane Michael. They’re part of a state-wide effort to provide medical support to injured and sick people in the aftermath of the storm. Governor Rick Scott:

“The Florida Department of Health has 80 ambulance strike teams and 400 ambulances to help with search and rescue operations, healthcare facility evaluations, and local EMS augmentation.”

Officials are warning people to review instructions on how to use generators as improper use can lead to carbon monoxide poisoning.

People should also stay alert for boil water advisories.

If you’d like to listen to the full story, please click on the clip above.


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Danielle Prieur

About Danielle Prieur

Reporter

Danielle Prieur is a general reporter for 90.7 News. She studied journalism at Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism and interned at 101.9 WDET. She is originally from the metro Detroit area.

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