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UF experts are teaming up with others to design a ventilator people can build in case the machines  are needed during the COVID-19 pandemic. In these images from video, components are demonstrated in the lab. Photo: UF
Health

UF experts collaborate to design a DIY ventilator for COVID-19 crisis


Imagine teams of volunteers building ventilators, with each team member assigned a job. One does the pipes. One does the electronics. One loads the software. Then they put it all together and, voila, a ventilator. This is possible, thanks to anesthesiology professor Sem Lampotang  and his team of open source collaborators at UF and around the world. Lampotang is an inventor with numerous medical patents. He designed a commercial ventilator years ago.  He says the engineering for this project is rigorous. The difference is anyone can get the parts, including PVC pipes and sprinkler valves. “The concept is a proven design,” Lampotang said. “What is not proven is using — I’m laughing a bit — is using Home Depot parts.” …
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Image: Hops grown in Florida Photo by Matt Roberts, orlandoweekly.com
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Local Beer Made With Florida Ingredients


What comes to mind when you imagine the aroma and flavor of a beer made with only Florida ingredients? If your first thoughts are sunscreen and swamp water, think again. Local brewers are determined to create an all-Florida beer, and climate change, of all things, is helping the dream come true. Barley and hops don’t do well in our tropical conditions and sandy soil. Another drawback is the length of daylight in summer – it’s actually shorter here than up north because of the angle of the earth as it tips toward the sun. But climate change has increased drought in the Western states, where most American hops are grown. And warmer temperatures overall mean even less risk of a …
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