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Intersection

Intersection: What’s Next For Puerto Rican Evacuees?


A FEMA program that’s been helping Puerto Rican families that have been living in hotels and motels has been extended for a few more weeks. Advocates have been going to court to seek more assistance. Denise Collazo, Chief of Staff of an advocacy group called Faith in Action, and Bob Cortes, Republican state representative, join us to talk about the outlook for these evacuees.
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Photo by Monivette Cordeiro, orlandoweekly.com
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Lack of housing in Central Florida for Puerto Rican Evacuees


More than 100 days after Hurricane Maria’s apocalyptic winds tore through Puerto Rico leaving floods, collapsed houses and bodies in its wake, the island remains shrouded in darkness. Half of 3.4 million U.S. citizens on the American territory are living without power three months after Maria made landfall on Sept. 20 – and many will likely remain that way until May. As Puerto Rico’s situation continues to deteriorate, hundreds of thousands of people have escaped to Florida for a respite from the despair. Instead, they’ve fled headfirst into the state’s affordable housing crisis. Local officials and nonprofits have been scrambling to accommodate evacuees who haven’t been staying with family members into hotels and temporary lodgings as they wait for relief. …
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Photo by Monivette Cordeiro, orlandoweekly.com
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Access to Healthcare for Puerto Ricans in Florida


Glorimarie Rodríguez knows staying behind in Puerto Rico’s darkness would have meant certain death for her 2-year-old son. In the week before Hurricane Maria hit the island, Matthew González was in the hospital with a bleeding ulcer and complications related to his disorder that required surgeries. After the storm, most of the island lost electricity and access to running water, including hospitals. Rodríguez knew Matthew needed the care of specialists immediately, and the chances of finding that during a humanitarian crisis were slim. So like thousands of others fleeing deteriorating conditions, Rodríguez and her toddler boarded a plane to Orlando. Unlike many who have made their way to Florida and remained uninsured, Rodríguez says she was able to get Medicaid …
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