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Destroyed home in Puerto Rico. Photo by Representative Amy Mercado
Intersection

Intersection: An Update On Puerto Rico, 5 Months After Maria


Five months after Hurricane Maria slammed into Puerto Rico, knocking out power and crippling infrastructure on the island, power and access to basics like clean water remain an issue for residents there. Intersection takes a look at how far the recovery effort has come, and what life is like for Puerto Ricans who’ve moved to Florida.
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Photo by Monivette Cordeiro, orlandoweekly.com
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Lack of housing in Central Florida for Puerto Rican Evacuees


More than 100 days after Hurricane Maria’s apocalyptic winds tore through Puerto Rico leaving floods, collapsed houses and bodies in its wake, the island remains shrouded in darkness. Half of 3.4 million U.S. citizens on the American territory are living without power three months after Maria made landfall on Sept. 20 – and many will likely remain that way until May. As Puerto Rico’s situation continues to deteriorate, hundreds of thousands of people have escaped to Florida for a respite from the despair. Instead, they’ve fled headfirst into the state’s affordable housing crisis. Local officials and nonprofits have been scrambling to accommodate evacuees who haven’t been staying with family members into hotels and temporary lodgings as they wait for relief. …
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Photo by Monivette Cordeiro, orlandoweekly.com
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

With the influx of Puerto Ricans fleeing Hurricane Maria’s wreckage, Central Florida’s affordable housing becomes a scarce resource


Ana Mieles wants to be buried in Puerto Rico. She tells her children this when she visits them every few months on the mainland. But Hurricane Maria destroyed her home. Now she’s staying with a daughter in Orlando, just one of thousands fleeing the wreckage. Like Mieles, many are staying with their families for now. Others, though, may need more permanent, affordable housing – a scarce resource in Central Florida. The Metro Orlando area ranks third in the nation for its lack of rental housing within reach for extremely low-income residents, with just 18 affordable units available for every 100 needy families. But state leaders estimate that about 100,000 Puerto Ricans will migrate to Florida in the coming months. Orange …
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