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Orlando reveals plans for Pulse memorial

Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer gives an update on the Pulse memorial and museum at the City Hall. The City of Orlando bought the Pulse property in October.
Joe Mario Pedersen
/
90.7 WMFE News
Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer gives an update on the Pulse memorial and museum at the City Hall. The City of Orlando bought the Pulse property in October.

Orlando is committed to opening a Pulse memorial and museum before 2026 – marking 10 years since the mass shooting that took the lives of 49 people.

It’s been two months since Orlando purchased the Pulse property for $2 million.

Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer said Tuesday morning that the city has been in talks with the onePulse Foundation, which has shared its plans for memorial designs. However, it will not be contributing to the project fund.

“We do not anticipate receiving any funds from the foundation. And if there happens to be some I'm not aware of it at this point,” Dyer said.

The onePULSE Foundation sent its final email to stakeholders Monday evening (12/18/23). It stated that the City of Orlando would be taking over the reins on developing a memorial for the 49 angels who were killed in a mass shooting on June 12, 2016.
Joe Mario Pedersen
/
90.7 WMFE News
The onePULSE Foundation sent its final email to stakeholders Monday evening (12/18/23). It stated that the City of Orlando would be taking over the reins on developing a memorial for the 49 angels who were killed in a mass shooting on June 12, 2016.

On Monday evening, the onePULSE Foundation sent its final email confirming that the City of Orlando would be overseeing future plans for the memorial development.

"Since the onePULSE Foundation Board of Directors has voted to dissolve their organization, this will be the final email sent from the foundation and all future emails will come from the City of Orlando," onePULSE stated.

When asked about onePULSE's decision to dissolve, Dyer said he was disappointed that the foundation did not live up to the promise of honoring those lost to the shooting.

“I never asked for the city to be in the position of being the leader on this project, but we feel very strongly that we need to step in and do this and I can promise you that will get the job done,” he said.

Dyer's big message was "transparency," and how he wished to keep the victims, families, survivors, and first responders updated every step of the way.

The city will also oversee the memorial’s development, as well as the annual remembrance ceremony on June 16, and the annual community rainbow run, which is in partnership with the University of Central Florida DeVos Sport Business Management Program.

Those wanting to donate specifically to the memorial can do so through the city’s Orlando United Pulse Memorial Fund, which is being operated under a 501(C)(3) previously established to fund the victims and their families after the Pulse shooting.

Originally from South Florida, Joe Mario came to Orlando to attend the University of Central Florida where he graduated with degrees in Radio & Television Production, Film, and Psychology. He worked several beats and covered multimedia at The Villages Daily Sun but returned to the City Beautiful as a reporter for the Orlando Sentinel where he covered crime, hurricanes, and viral news. Joe Mario has too many interests and not enough time but tries to focus on his love for strange stories in comic books and horror movies. When he's not writing he loves to run in his spare time.
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