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Lawmakers representing The Villages aim to make riding seatless bikes legal in Florida


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ElliptiGOs provide low-impact outdoor exercise. Photo: Courtesy of ElliptiGO Corp.

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Representative Brett Hage’s bill making it legal in Florida to ride bicycles built without seats drew chuckles — and then approval — from a House committee last week.

Hage and Senator Dennis Baxley want to clear the way for the ElliptiGO in The Villages.

Hage’s bill will change a law that says cyclists must ride “upon or astride a permanent and regular seat.” If not, they can get a ticket starting for $15.

But Hage says his constituents are riding ElliptiGOs, which combine an elliptical machine, like those in a gym, and a bicycle. And ElliptiGOs don’t have seats.

You don’t see them often in The Villages. And the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office reports only one ticket for a seatless bike in the past two years.

But the ElliptiGOs could be coming. Mike Ruffalo — a brand ambassador in Naples — says more people are using them for low-impact outdoor exercise during the pandemic.

He can’t imagine it’s an issue for law enforcement.

“In fact, it’s safer than a bicycle because you’re in a standing position and much more visible to cars and traffic and pedestrians,” Ruffalo said.

And pretty soon riding them could be legal, too.


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Joe Byrnes

About Joe Byrnes

Reporter

Joe Byrnes came to WMFE/WMFV from the Ocala Star-Banner and The Gainesville Sun, where he worked as a reporter and editor for several years. Joe graduated from Loyola University in New Orleans and turned to journalism after teaching. He enjoys freshwater fishing and family gatherings.

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