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Fertilizer Regulations Take Effect in Brevard County, Those Include Mandatory Signs in Stores


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The county says reducing nitrogen and phosphorus in waterways is a step toward preventing toxic algal blooms. Photo: Flickr Creative Commons

The county says reducing nitrogen and phosphorus in waterways is a step toward preventing toxic algal blooms. Photo: Flickr Creative Commons

Brevard County stores are putting up signs explaining the best ways to fertilize along the ailing Indian River Lagoon.

That’s in response to a new county ordinance.

The signs explain county rules around fertilizer use.

County spokesman Don Walker says that includes avoiding fertilizer use during the rainy season and using fertilizers during the dry season that minimize nutrient pollution in the lagoon.

“And again, we can’t tell people what they can and can’t put on their shelves at home nor their pantries. Nor can we tell them what they can put in their garage or on their yard. But we can at least try to educate them in the types of fertilizers they should be buying and using and how not to overuse it.”

Walker says businesses that don’t comply with this new rule will receive citations and fines of up to $500 dollars.

He says these rules will help curb the nutrient pollution from fertilizers. 

Bryan White of Brevard Farm and Ranch Supply owns a store that sells fertilizer. He say he doesn’t mind hanging a sign but:

“I believe people are going to do what they’re going to do anyway. But I do believe that people over fertilize. I do definitely believe that. So I just think they need to educate people a little bit better.”

While Leesa Souto of the Marine Resources Council says the reminders should change consumer buying behaviors.

“The point of sale is the most important place to educate people about the fertilizer ordinances. Any information you can get at the point of sale where the consumer is making a choice about the product is going to be helpful.”

The county says reducing nitrogen and phosphorus in waterways is a step toward preventing toxic algal blooms.

If you’d like to listen to the full story, please click on the clip above.


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Danielle Prieur

About Danielle Prieur

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Danielle Prieur grew up listening to her grandfather’s stories of swimming across the Detroit River from Canada and many other adventures. She’s been into storytelling ever since. She studied writing at the University of Michigan. She trained in public radio at WDET’s Detroit newsroom, and is really excited ... Read Full Bio »

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