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Are We There Yet? Podcast

There’s a lot going on up there. Join space reporter Brendan Byrne each week as he explores space exploration. From efforts to launch humans into deep space, to the probes exploring our solar system, Are We There Yet? brings you the latest in news from the space beat. Listen to interviews with astronauts, engineers and visionaries as humanity takes its next giant leap exploring our universe.

Listen by clicking on the episodes below, on the WMFE mobile app, or subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play Music, Spotify or RSS Feed.

Are We There Yet? on iTunes Are We There Yet? on Stitcher Are We There Yet? in Google Music Are We There Yet? on Spotify



SpaceX’s Cargo Dragon undocks from the International Space Station ahead of a planned splashdown off the coast of Florida. Photo: SpaceX / Twitter
Space

Speedy Space Delivery


After spending about a month on the International Space Station, SpaceX’s new Cargon Dragon capsule splashed down off the coast of Florida. It’s a departure from previous versions of the vehicle which splashed down in the Pacific. The new splash zone means scientists can get their hands on their returning equipment faster, meaning they can make critical observations of experiments quicker and opening up more opportunities for space-based science.
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Space

Rockets With Frickin’ Laser Beams. Uncovering The Mystery Of Moon Dust


https://wmfe-od.streamguys1.com/awty/AWTYep257_MoonLaser.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: RSSWhen it comes to how dirt on the moon behaves, scientists are still in the dark. Moon sand, also called regolith, is pretty mysterious — but one team of University of Central Florida scientists want to shed some light on lunar dust clouds…by shooting lasers at it. Understanding how dust behaves on the moon and other planetary surfaces is critical for future space exploration missions. Exhaust from a spacecraft’s landing engines could kick up razor-sharp moon dust that could damage instruments or obscure the view of landing. A team led …
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NASA’s Kayla Barron joins the Artemis cadre and will train for a possible mission to the moon. Photo: NASA
Space

An Artemis Astronaut & Recap Of 2020 Space News


NASA announced the first group of astronauts who will train for a mission to the moon. We’ll talk with one of those astronauts, Kayla Barron, about the selection and what the mission means for women in the astronaut corps.
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The Hubble Telescope in orbit. Photo: NASA
Space

Hubble: 30 Years Of Spectacular Celestial Images


For the last three decades, the Hubble Space Telescope has peered deep into our universe, exploring the origins of the cosmos and capturing stunning views of stars, clusters and galaxies. Now, NASA is releasing a catalogue of some of its most dazzling images — some you can see yourself from your own backyard.
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Aevum CEO and founder Jay Skylus poses with his company’s Ravn X UAV launch vehicle. Photo: Aevum.
Space

The Big Business Of Small Satellites


A new company plans to launch small satellites from the belly of a drone. It joins the growing number of small launch companies popping up to send tiny payloads into space. So what’s the market for these small satellites?
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Operations at the UCF-managed Arecibo Observatory (pictured here in the spring of 2019) are stopped until repairs can be made from an incident in August that caused a 100-foot-long gash on the telescope’s reflector dish. Photo: UCF
Space

Arecibo’s Legacy


For nearly six decades, a 1,000 foot dish in a Puerto Rican forest has led the charge in searching for far away planets, alien life and tracking near-Earth asteroids. It’s also had cameos in television and film including the 1995 James Bond movie Goldeneye. Now, that dish is going dark.
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