WMFE is Central Florida's primary provider of NPR programming on 90.7 FM and Classical Music on 90.7 HD2. Part of the community since 1965, WMFE focuses on providing quality national and local news and programming. We inspire and empower all Central Floridians to discover, grow and engage within and beyond their world.
Support for 90.7 WMFE is provided by

Boating Accidents In Florida Rose In 2017

Stay up to date on coronavirus coverage: Listen to WMFE on your radio, the WMFE mobile app or your smart speaker — say “Alexa, play NPR” or “WMFE” and you’ll be connected.

Correction: WMFE independently confirmed the rise in the number of boating accidents in Florida was 7 percent last year.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Officials say the number of boating accidents in Florida is rising.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission on Wednesday released its annual boating accident report that showed that there was a nearly 14 percent rise in accidents in 2017. A total of 67 people died in boating accidents, which was the same number of deaths there were in 2016.

The report shows that Florida leads the nation in both boating accidents and boating deaths.

In 2017, 261 boating accidents involved collisions, and 38 percent of all collisions were due to inattention or the operator failing to maintain a proper lookout.

The commission also said that falls overboard have been the leading type of fatal accident since 2003, with drowning as the leading cause of death.


Get The 90.7 WMFE Newsletter

Your trusted news source for the latest Central Florida COVID-19 news, updates on special programs and more. Support our extended coverage.

GET THE LATEST

WMFE Journalistic Ethics Code | Public Media Code of Integrity

TOP