WMFE is Central Florida's primary provider of NPR programming on 90.7 FM and Classical Music on 90.7 HD2. Part of the community since 1965, WMFE focuses on providing quality national and local news and programming. We inspire and empower all Central Floridians to discover, grow and engage within and beyond their world.
CLOSEOpt Out: I already like WMFE!

Like us on Facebook!

Support for 90.7 WMFE is provided by
Image: Split Oak Forest by Monivette Cordeiro
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Environmental activists rally to save the Split Oak Forest from an expanding toll road


Off the sandy path, Dave Wegman squats near a small burrow hidden behind scrub. “Careful,” he warns, pointing to the white sand circling the half-moon hole like a skirt. Gopher tortoises lay their eggs under the smooth surface, but it looks like no one’s home today. For several months, Wegman and other environmentalists have led treks through the Split Oak Forest Wildlife and Environmental Area, a nearly 1,700-acre preserve on the outskirts of Orlando’s Lake Nona community. Aside from harboring the threatened gopher tortoise species, Split Oak is home to Florida scrub jays, sandhill cranes, Sherman’s fox squirrels, gopher frogs and bald eagles. No hunting, camping or biking is allowed in Split Oak – only hiking and permitted horse riding. …
Read More »



Image: Reisterstown Mall, 1965 , mennellomuseum.org
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Mennello Museum of American Art. Grace Hartigan 1960-1965: The Perry Collection


In a media moment that’s focused on the female, it would be easy to lump in the current exhibition at the Mennello Museum of American Art. Grace Hartigan 1960-1965: The Perry Collection shows the work of a female painter as collected by a female art dealer, and occupies walls in a female-run museum. But that would be reductive. The goal of our current drive for equality is to break out of the walled garden of gender. Regardless, Hartigan is lumped in to the box labeled “Female Abstract Expressionists” – a group that includes Helen Frankenthaler, Elaine De Kooning and Lee Krasner – coverage of whom always (explicitly or implicitly) measures them against the yardstick of their male contemporaries. So, can …
Read More »



Support for 90.7 News is provided by
Image: Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun, wikipedia.org
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

As Roe v. Wade turns 45, women’s right to bodily autonomy is increasingly under attack


January 22 marked 45 years since the Supreme Court ruled on Roe v. Wade.  But tensions over abortion rights have always simmered in the Sunshine State.  An example: the 2015 bill that enacted a 24-hour waiting period for women seeking an abortion in Florida. The law has since been ruled unconstitutional. Then there’s the flip side: the advocates, like Sally Blackmun, a former chairwoman for Planned Parenthood of Greater Orlando – someone who carries a story intertwined deep within the details of Roe v Wade. Blackmun falls silent for a moment when asked about the legacy of her late father, Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun, who is best known for writing the Roe v Wade decision. Years before the decision, …
Read More »



Image: photo by Daymon Gardner for Dear World, orlandoweekly.com
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

More than a year and a half after the Pulse massacre, first responders still struggle with the trauma


Every night for the past 19 months, Omar Delgado has had the same exact nightmare. He’s back inside Pulse. He’s dragging someone who’s still alive through blood and glass, away from the bodies strewn across the dance floor under the blinking disco light. Then he hears the puncturing sound of bullets in the air. Another officer screams, “Get down, get down!” He falls down as shots continue to ring, waiting for them to stop and for his body to wake up yelling and screaming. Delgado, a former corporal with the Eatonville Police Department, is now beginning to adjust to civilian life after being let go from his job in December, months after he was proclaimed a hero for responding to …
Read More »



Image: Photo via Florida Constitution Revision Commission
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

The Constitution Revision Commission


Congratulations, Floridians. Each and every one of you is special. But possibly not for the reasons you think. Floridians are special because our state’s process for constitutional reform might be the weirdest in the country. Just once every 20 years, we convene something called the Constitution Revision Commission. Thirty-seven people are appointed by our state government to hold a year of public hearings  .   and at these hearings, Floridians can directly propose constitutional amendments. During the year, the CRC reviews and votes on public input, and proposes amendments of their own. In November, the approved proposals go right on the ballot. So the CRC is an exercise in expedited democracy. But of course, politics is never simple, and this year …
Read More »



Photo by Monivette Cordeiro, orlandoweekly.com
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Lack of housing in Central Florida for Puerto Rican Evacuees


More than 100 days after Hurricane Maria’s apocalyptic winds tore through Puerto Rico leaving floods, collapsed houses and bodies in its wake, the island remains shrouded in darkness. Half of 3.4 million U.S. citizens on the American territory are living without power three months after Maria made landfall on Sept. 20 – and many will likely remain that way until May. As Puerto Rico’s situation continues to deteriorate, hundreds of thousands of people have escaped to Florida for a respite from the despair. Instead, they’ve fled headfirst into the state’s affordable housing crisis. Local officials and nonprofits have been scrambling to accommodate evacuees who haven’t been staying with family members into hotels and temporary lodgings as they wait for relief. …
Read More »



Photo via WPRK, orlandoweekly.com
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

WPRK has been off the air for nearly 3 months, but will return


Those who have tried to tune their radio dials to WPRK 91.5 in recent months have been met with one of two things: all-out static or the occasional crackle of what sounds like Sunday morning church. No, Rollins College’s storied WPRK hasn’t had the plug pulled. That’s the bleed-over from its Christian contemporary neighbor on the dial, WHIF 91.3. The problem is simple: WPRK’s antenna has been down for months, leaving them no way to broadcast a signal.On September 8th, less than two days before Hurricane Irma made landfall, the station staff made the decision to sign off for safety, says Greg Golden, director of student media. It was supposed to be a temporary hunker-down, but the silence on the …
Read More »



Photo by Monivette Cordeiro, orlandoweekly.com
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Access to Healthcare for Puerto Ricans in Florida


Glorimarie Rodríguez knows staying behind in Puerto Rico’s darkness would have meant certain death for her 2-year-old son. In the week before Hurricane Maria hit the island, Matthew González was in the hospital with a bleeding ulcer and complications related to his disorder that required surgeries. After the storm, most of the island lost electricity and access to running water, including hospitals. Rodríguez knew Matthew needed the care of specialists immediately, and the chances of finding that during a humanitarian crisis were slim. So like thousands of others fleeing deteriorating conditions, Rodríguez and her toddler boarded a plane to Orlando. Unlike many who have made their way to Florida and remained uninsured, Rodríguez says she was able to get Medicaid …
Read More »



Image: orlandoweekly.com
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Tourism Campaign Declares Orlando’s Signature Dish


Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs gathered the region’s tourism leaders last April to ask a question with no answer: “Does Orlando have a signature dish?” Philadelphia has cheesesteaks. London has fish and chips. But Orlando? Despite being one of the world’s top destinations and home to unrivaled culinary talent, the City Beautiful isn’t known for a particular delicacy – our gastronomic delights in the eyes of visitors include gargantuan turkey legs, Dole Whip and butterbeer. So Jacobs proposed a meeting of the minds – the best local chefs in the city’s burgeoning restaurant industry would gather with our quasi-public tourism agency, Visit Orlando, to create a signature dish. After Jacobs’ call to action, local foodies proposed a number of native …
Read More »



Image: Maternal Mortality Rate
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Shocking Rate of Maternal Mortality and Morbidity in the United States


One of the most underreported stories of 2017 is the shocking rate of maternal mortality and morbidity in the United States, which is rising steadily while it falls everywhere else in the developed world. Each year over 600 women in the U.S. die from pregnancy-related causes and more than 65,000 experience life-threatening complications, says a report by the Women’s Congressional Policy Institute. Inadequate medical coverage in rural areas, racial disparities in access to care, the ever-more-confusing health system and the rising age of mothers are all drivers of this maternal health crisis. Whatever the causes, the reason the story is so little-known isn’t mysterious. In the patchwork of recordkeeping across 50 states, data on deaths caused by pregnancy is difficult …
Read More »




TOP