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Image: Gold Fame Citrus by Claire Vaye Watkins
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Gold Fame Citrus by Claire Vaye Watkins


Much of the South celebrated Christmas in shorts last month; 2015 was the warmest year on record across the globe. While droughty California became ever more parched, Texas and Oklahoma were rocked by floods in their wettest May ever. In March, a nurse filed suit after being infected with Ebola when that virus jumped borders to the U.S. But readers of the growing genre of post-apocalyptic fiction were mentally prepared for all this. Last year was stuffed with literary disaster porn — like Station Eleven, Black Moon, and Gold Fame Citrus, Claire Watkins’ novel of a waterless American West. (Think Chinatown crossed with Cormac McCarthy’s The Road.) The novel’s highest achievement may be the way it avoids the disaster-as-metaphor dodge …
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Image: prisonlegalnews.org
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

FL prohibits distribution of Prison Legal News


If you’re serving time in prison, it would probably interest you to read news about dangerous cost-cutting measures made by for-profit prison corporations or excessive fees charged to inmates to make phone calls home. That’s why Prison Legal News, a publication that’s been serving prison-centric news and editorials to subscribers since 1990, is such a popular publication among prison inmates around the country. But in Florida, the state Department of Corrections is keeping the monthly magazine out of prisoners’ hands, claiming that ads in the magazine pose threats to prison safety. Since 2009 the state has intercepted subscriptions to prisoners, and in 2011, the publication sued the DOC charging it with violating the First Amendment. The court battle has had …
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Photo: Mick Jagger ,  Bob Bonis / courtesy BobBonis.com
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

OMA The British Invasion collection


Florida has long played muse to a certain kind of songwriter — your Jimmy Buffetts, your Bertie Higginses — but it may come as a surprise that a sunny day poolside at a Clearwater motel was the birthplace of the Rolling Stones’ breakthrough hit, “Satisfaction.” Or so Keith Richards claimed in his 2010 memoir. Which fans the flames of intrigue for a show now at the Orlando Museum of Art. The British Invasion is a collection of pictures taken by Bob Bonis, American tour manager for the Stones from 1964 to ’66. The snaps he took, mostly unpublished during his life, revel in and reveal his intimate access to the band, showing Mick, Keith and the boys not just performing …
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Mohammad Akhtar, president of Muslim Council of America, orlandoweekly.com
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Local Muslims gathered to share their thoughts and fears with the public.


Two weeks after the shooting in San Bernardino California, in which a couple thought to have been inspired by ISIS killed 14 people, local Muslims gathered to share their thoughts and fears with the public. A group, which included U.S. Rep. Alan Grayson and Orange County Sheriff Jerry Demings, listened as men and women talked about feeling threatened, bullied or looked at with suspicion. One woman said she was afraid to wear her hijab out in public after the San Bernardino shootings. A 17-year-old girl, who has lived in the United States her entire life, said she has a hard time making friends at school. Over and over again, Muslim Americans are asked to prove their humanity and that they …
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Image: Orlando Weekly 25th Anniversary logo, orlandoweekly.com
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Orlando Weekly 25th Anniversary- A Look Back


25 years ago, Orlando was a different city – there was no Dr. Phillips Performing Arts Center or Amway Center, Universal Orlando was just opening its doors to tourists and Orlando Weekly was just launching as The Weekly, a home-delivered weekly publication owned by the Toronto Sun. As the years have passed, we’ve seen a lot of change in the City Beautiful. Our downtown may not have the edgy outsider vibe that it used to, but it does attract what Mayor Buddy Dyer calls “world-class” performing arts. Dyer has realized the dream of having a performing arts center across from City Hall – a dream that originated with his predecessor Mayor Glenda Hood. And The Weekly has graduated to become …
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Image:  UCF White Student Union Facebook page
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

UCF White Student Union Sparks Controversy


Recent student protests against racial injustice at the University of Missouri sparked similar movements on college campuses nationwide, and the University of Central Florida is no exception. Two weeks ago, UCF’s Black Student Union held a sit-in to support the organization that spearheaded the Missouri protests. But a few days after that, someone created a Facebook page called “White Student Union at UCF,” claiming to see in Black Lives Matter protests “an explicit hostility to white students, faculty, and culture.” In a lengthy statement to the press last week, the UCF White Student Union said: “We are not a racist or white supremacist organization… But we will not apologize for being white. We will not self-flagellate for the sins of …
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Thornton Park, cityoforlando.net
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Buy Local on Black Friday


The origin of the phrase “Black Friday” is twisty. Its first published use was in 1951, in a newspaper story about the mysterious illness that seemed to strike employees on the Friday after Thanksgiving. Once most employers caved in and began offering a four-day weekend, it naturally became a shopping bonanza – so much so that, in Philadelphia, traffic police began calling it … Black Friday. In the early ’60s, a Philadelphia paper picked up the term in their reporting of the annual shopping rush, and eventually it went national. But retailers didn’t like the negative connotations, so in the ’80s they concocted a story that Black Friday is so-called because it’s the day of the year when they get …
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Patriarchy” by Farley Aguilar (oil on linen, 2015). Photo courtesy Orlando Museum of Art
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Florida Prize in Contemporary Art – OMART


At a time when so much of the news is dismal, and we’re all inundated with it thanks to ever-present social media, the consolations of art are more important than ever. But what to do when our artists refuse to soothe us with pretty pictures? This week, Orlando Museum of Art opens the second iteration of their Florida Prize in Contemporary Art. As it did last year, the invitational exhibition gathers 10 contemporary Florida artists to show their work; one will win a five-figure cash prize. But this year’s group is a more serious bunch. 2014’s show was a colorful riot throughout OMA’s galleries, and it was a lot of fun. The 2015 show – while no less visually delightful …
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Orlando Weekly logo, orlandoweekly.com
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Orange County Voters Say Partisanship Is Not A Good Idea


A funny thing happened on the way to November. You might recall that Orange County voters were asked to register their feelings on making local elections partisan, thereby moving the elections of wonderful lovers of transparency like Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs to presidential years. More of a fair competition, you say? Voters said no! By about 55 percent, your friends and neighbors said that this wasn’t a good idea, because partisanship is awful.
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Lorna Lambey with her late husband, Mark Wayne
Commentaries

The Final Night of the Red Fox Lounge


There’s been a lot of frustration and sadness lately when it comes to new developments in Orlando scheduled to displaced beloved older spaces. Recently Theatre Downtown announced that its landlord, Florida Hospital, has plans for the building the theater has called home for 25 years. The theater has to vacate by the end of January. Shortly after that, we learned that a developer is buying multiple properties in Ivanhoe Village and will be transforming the neighborhood’s artsy warehouse district into multistory mixed-use spaces.
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