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Image: Monarch Butterflies nectaring on Swamp Milkweed. Photo by Peg Urban
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Native Milkweed is important to the success of the Monarch Butterfly


As summer weather winds down, conservationists are keeping an eye on the annual monarch migration. And many local gardeners are trying to do everything they can to support the black-and-orange butterflies on their journey south – but they might be loving them to death. Pollinator gardens help monarchs by providing them with their preferred food, milkweed. There are dozens of varieties of milkweed. Tropical milkweed lives in Florida year-round, which is cool if you just want to see butterflies in your yard all year. But if you want to help rebuild the declining population, you need to plant the right kind of milkweed – a native variety that dies back in the fall. If monarchs stay here all winter stuffing …
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Image: Dominique Jackson in Pose, orlandoweekly.com
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Stonewall brings ‘Pose’ cast members to Orlando for Pride Events


Dominique Jackson doesn’t believe in tolerance. It’s a lesson she learned growing up on the island of Tobago as a little girl who was assigned male at birth. The transgender teen escaped to the United States and lived as an undocumented immigrant. Her family offered to help her become a legal resident as long as she kept her truth a secret. Jackson refused. The actress and model says, “”My life is not for someone else to accept. … When people told me they were tolerating the LGBTQ+ community, those feelings were coming from a place of privilege and superiority, not from a place of equality.” Jackson, though, found a real home in underground ballroom culture – much like Elektra Abundance, …
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Image: New Generation” by Elizabeth Catlett
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Dual-location exhibition portrays scenes of the African American experience


Too often art by what we refer to as “minorities” is forced to bear a double weight. We expect it to be not just beautiful, but also educational. Under that expectation, looking at art by women, people of color, disabled people and other artists in marginalized communities can then feel more preachy than pleasurable. Without leaving meaning or history behind, the show currently co-located at the Crealdé School of Art and the Hannibal Square Heritage Center is a pleasure to take in. Vibrant Vision is a selection of works by 20th-century African American artists drawn from the collection of Charleston painter Jonathan Green. Barbara Tiffany, Crealdé’s exhibitions curator, has chosen 26 works, some that “told profound stories about the artists …
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Image: Jamilah Sabur, Untitled, 2017, Video still ,rollins.edu/cornell-fine-arts-museum
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Cornell Fine Arts Museum: Ibine Ela Acu by Jamilah Sabur


Before she left Orlando, Cornell Fine Arts Museum curator Amy Galpin organized a show by Miami artist Jamilah Sabur called Ibine Ela Acu/Water Sun Moon. It’s Sabur’s first solo show in a museum, but it’s unlikely to be her last. Sabur works in performance and multimedia installation, often incorporating video of herself performing ritualistic actions. In this show, the videos give the viewer the feeling of having trespassed on a secret rite, a hidden process by which Sabur physically unearths memory, transforming history into intention. The title, Ibine Ela Acu, is in the now-dead language of the Timucua, the extinct indigenous Northern Florida people, and this show uses Florida’s history of violence and colonialism, as well environmental erosion, pollution and …
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Image: Facebook profile picture for Londonn Moore
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Fifth Homicide of Trans Woman in Florida This Year


A black transgender woman was shot to death in southwest Florida last week, making her the fifth trans woman to be murdered in this state within the past seven months. Twenty-year-old Londonn Moore was found lying in the road around Sept. 8 in North Port, several miles away from her hometown of Port Charlotte. After the homicide, North Port Police and several local media outlets have misgendered Moore and referred to her dead name. Moore’s murder comes two months after 27-year-old Sasha Garden, another black trans woman, was found dead with signs of trauma at the back of an Orlando apartment complex on July 19. The Orange County Sheriff’s Office say Garden’s case remains “active and open.” The first rash …
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Image: Photo by Jen Cray, orlandoweekly.com
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

FDA announces crackdown on vaping industry


Orlando’s Matt Kleizo built a vape company because he wanted to help smokers quit. Fast Eddie’s Vape Shop, named after Kleizo’s 6-year-old son, is the center of what he says is a $10 million company. A former smoker, he says vaping was his key to quitting. But the vaping industry is at a crossroads as advocates and opponents weigh the risks. Cigarettes are the leading cause of preventable death in the United States; smoking kills almost half a million people every year. The dilemma facing vape advocates is this: how to get addicted smokers to switch to less harmful e-cigarettes, without tempting non-smokers into a nicotine habit. The 2017 Florida Youth Tobacco Survey found that Florida high-school students used e-cigarettes …
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Image: Disney Workers, by Monivette Cordeiro, orlandoweekly.com
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

New study ranks Florida toward the bottom in Oxfam America’s “Best States to Work” index as 37th in the nation


Surprising no one who has worked for chump change in Florida’s billion-dollar tourism industry, a new study ranks the state toward the bottom in Oxfam America’s “Best States to Work” index as 37th in the nation. Florida’s minimum wage of $8.25 per hour is slightly higher than the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour. But a person working full time under the state’s minimum wage only makes about 32 percent of the living wages needed to support a family of four – the same person supporting a family of four in Florida would need to earn $25.87. The report from the anti-poverty organization also noted that municipal governments in the Sunshine State don’t have the ability to raise the …
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Photo via Disney
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Labor unions reach agreement with Disney for $15 by 2021


Aside from election news, this week had a development that could bring a major overhaul to Central Florida’s tourism industry. Six Orlando labor unions representing 38,000 workers say that they have tentatively reached a “historic” agreement with Walt Disney World to raise starting hourly pay from $10 to $15 by 2021. If approved by union members in September, the new contract would raise the minimum wage at Disney to $11 by December 2018 and keep going up in yearly increments until reaching $15 in October 2021. The Service Trades Council Union said this week that the new four-year contract agreement makes “no major concessions” to the theme park company regarding union rights and benefits. A Disney spokesperson said the company …
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Image: Anti Face -This face is unrecognizable to several state-of-art face detection algorithms, cvdazzle.com
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

Hiding in Plain Sight from Surveillance Technology


Everywhere we go, we’re being scanned by cameras. You expect it in airports, banks and stores, but as we’ve learned recently, the city of Orlando is experimenting with real-time surveillance technology in public spaces. If this doesn’t sit right with you, there are ways to preserve your anonymity from the cameras, though you may draw extra attention from your fellow citizens on the street. For instance, artist Adam Harvey created a strategy for hiding in plain sight inspired by the dazzle camouflage employed in World War I. By covering warships with blocky stripes and patterns in high-contrast colors, Allied officers made it tough for the enemy to estimate their size, speed and direction of travel. It turns out this fool-the-eye …
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Photo by Andy Cross, The Denver Post. Donald Trump supporter gets heated toward a member of the media.
From the Pages of Orlando Weekly

The Press Is Not The Enemy Of The People


Florida’s tourism board paid Miami rapper Pitbull $1 million of taxpayer money to promote the state in a video called “Sexy Beaches.” After the Trump Foundation made a $25,000 donation to Pam Bondi’s re-election fund, Bondi decided Florida would not join a fraud suit against Trump University. Orlando is the first city in the country experimenting with real-time facial recognition, a form of public surveillance unprecedented in American law enforcement. What do these things have in common? Floridians wouldn’t know about any of them without journalists. Reporters across the state followed the paper trail and did the legwork to serve the public’s right to know. And yet, our current president demonizes the free press as “the enemy of the people.” …
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